Landscaping, Irrigation, and More - R & R Sprinkler & Lanscape, Inc. of Cape Coral, Florida Blog

Landscaping, Irrigation, and More

R & R Sprinkler & Lanscape, Inc. of Cape Coral, Florida Blog

My Dog Is Destroying My Fort Myers Yard!

Posted by Landscaping, Irrigation and More On August 14, 2012

We all love fido. He’s our best friend. He provides unconditional love. He’s a member of our family. He also can destroy our yard!

There are two main ways we can identify with as areas that your dog can damage or destroy your Fort Myers yard.

1. Digging
2. Urinating

DIGGING
A digging dog may be bored. Perhaps they need more attention from you. A good walk or some back yard play time may be good for both of you.

A digging dog can also be hiding his valued treasures such as toys or bones in which case we would recommend you not let him take these items into the yard. Perhaps they will be content to just hide them in the couch instead.

A digging dog may also be a phase of their life because they are young. Obedience training and lots of patience will help Fido get past these days. Usually a dog will out grow this by the age of 3 (you hope!).

URINATING
Some dogs are such creatures of habit that they will urinate in the same spot over and over and over again. Moderate urination will actually help the grass by fertilizing it. Over urination in one spot will damage the grass due to the high concentrations of nitrogen.

If your dog has the habit of using the potty in the same spot perhaps you’ll need to follow closely behind them to shuffle them to a different area of your Fort Myers yard. Encourage them to use the whole yard instead of a few choice spots. There are even some over the counter sprays at local pet stores that will help discourage them from using a certain area.

If they just refuse to use another area of your Fort Myers yard then pull the garden hose out and water the area down frequently to dilute the effects of the urine.

If you need us to renovate your landscaping or replace some sod let us know. Just remember, Fido loves you. Don’t let a few holes or yellowed spots in your yard alter your affection for him.

Did Tropical Storm Debbie Burn Your Lawn?

Posted by Landscaping, Irrigation and More On August 8, 2012

Can you believe it’s already been a month since we felt the impact of tropical storm Debbie? We’ve been flooded with calls about dying grass. We are not surprised to find that most of the complaints are from customers that live along the salt water.

Not only did we see the levels of our canals rise over the sea walls and saturate our lawns but Tropical Storm Debbie was also accompanied by high winds. High winds tossed all of that salt water over our houses, landscaping and yards. The areas that got misted with the salt water will most likely recover quickly with the natural drying out process and fresh water rains our Southwest Florida climate affords to us in the summertime.

The areas along the sea walls and near the water’s edge may or may not be as lucky. Too much water on a yard is as dangerous as too little. Too much salty water on a lawn is disasterous. The salt burns the grass. If you notice you have brown spots or your grass is dying where you know there was storm surge, flooding or water sitting that was salty your best course of action is to soak it with fresh water. Fortunatley for Southwest Florida we have had a lot of afternoon storms to help wash away the saltiness that Tropical Storm Debbie brought us.

If this doesn’t appear to be working you may consider adding a little bit of fresh water garden hose time to the area, you may need to fertilize the area (moderately), you may need to re-seed the area or you may even need to consider re-sodding the area. If you live in an area prone to surges of salt water you may want to consider adding a rock bed, mulch bed, an area of pavers or maybe even a retention wall in lieu of replacing sod. R & R Sprinkler and Landscape can send our experienced staff to advise you of your best course of action.

Above all else remember, lawn technicians, landscapers and sprinkler system companies have no control over the weather. If you were the unfortunate one that sodded a yard or planted new landscaping along an area adjacent to salt water just before Tropical Storm Debbie – be kind. Any good business owner will help you the best they can but they cannot warranty items caused by Mother Nature flexing her muscles.

City of Marco Island Watering Restrictions

Posted by Landscaping, Irrigation and More On July 20, 2012

As of July 10, 2012 The City of Marco Island is enforcing the following watering restrictions:

Landscaping Irrigation-Established:
Odd numbered addresses
3 days each week; Monday, Wednesday, Saturday; 12:01 am to 8:00 am for irrigation systems

Even numbered addresses:
3 days each week; Tuesday, Thursday, Sunday, 12:01 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. for irrigation systems

Landscaping Irrigation–New (in place less than 90 days):
All addresses 5 days each week; Monday through Friday, 12:01 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. for irrigation systems

Irrigation System Maintenance :
Existing systems –
10 minutes per zone per week; person must be present in zone and working on the system during each such operation

New systems-
30 minutes per zone, one time only; person must be present in zone and working on the
system during such operation

Pesticide, Fungicide, Herbicide, Fertilizer Application:
All addresses. Application shall be coordinated with the scheduled day/time for landscaping irrigation; if applied outside of the allowed hours, and “watering in” is specified by the manufacturer of the applied material, a licensed application technician must be on the premises

Other Outdoor Water Uses:
All other outdoor water uses Other outdoor water uses, including low volume hand watering, car, truck,and boat washing and the washing of exterior home surfaces and roofs, shall be allowed anytime with the use of low volume pressure cleaning equipment, low volume mobile equipment washing and/or water hose equipped with an automatic self-canceling or automatic shutoff nozzle; in all cases, the water used must drain to a pervious surface or to a water recycling/reuse system

For more information follow the link: http://www.cityofmarcoisland.com/modules/showdocument.aspx?documentid=7463

Curb Appeal for Your Southwest Florida Property

Posted by Landscaping, Irrigation and More On June 25, 2012

There are some simple and inexpensive ways to maintain the curb appeal of your Southwest Florida Home.

1. BE CLEAN
Keep your grass mowed. Clean up fallen tree branches and palm fronds. Keep pine cones, pine needles and fallen flowers and debris consolidated and picked up.

2. BE NEAT
Keep your trees and shrubs neatly trimmed. Keep your flower beds and landscape island edged. Noting is worse then a row of edges blocking the window of a home. It blocks light into the house, it block the view out of the house and it looks unkept.

3. ADD COLOR
What a difference adding a little pop of color makes to the front of a house. Small, seasonal plants such as impatients, pansies or mums make a big impact with just a little bit of output.

4. KEEP MULCH FRESH
Flower beds with mulch fade in the Florida climate. Throw some fresh mulch in your flower beds and landscape island for a renewed look to your property.

5. GET RID OF THE WEEDS
A house with weeds screams “unkept home” or “abandoned house”. If you are like most of us, you don’t have time to spend hours to pull weeds from your yard and landscape. You can purchase a sprayer and some weed killer from your local garden center. Take a walk around your house once a week to spray the weeds. You’ll kill your weeds and get some exercise in the process.

6. KEEP YOUR GRASS GREEN
This is often easier said then done with dry seasons and water restrictions. However, installing an automatic irrigation system is a step in the right direction. Once you have a sprinkler system installed you must be meticulous in keeping the sprinkler heads accurately adjusted to get the best coverage of your grass and landscaping. An irrigation maintenance contract is a wise investment if you are not fond of the mechanical aspects of maintaining an irrigation system.